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CCG supports Dementia Awareness Week activities

20th May 2014 | By Liz Mattock | Posted in

Dr Jawahar, board GP and lead for mental health at Leicester City CCG with patient Chanchal Ben Mistry

Dr Jawahar, board GP and lead for mental health at Leicester City CCG with patient Chanchal Ben Mistry

Patients, families and carers from black and ethnic minority communities in the city benefitted from GP advice when they attended a dementia event at the weekend.

The event, held at Shree Ram Mandir Hindu Community Centre on Hildyard Road on Sunday May 18, between 10.30am and 3.30pm was held to help raise awareness of dementia and provide people with advice and support if they, a member of their family, or someone they care for had concerns about their memory. The event marked the start of Dementia Awareness Week and was hosted by the Alzheimer’s Society and supported by Leicester City Clinical Commissioning Group and Leicester City Council.

There are thought to be around 11,000 people living with dementia in Leicester and Leicestershire, but many are still undiagnosed. Raising awareness of dementia, leads to earlier diagnosis which means better care can be provided to both patients and their carers.

Dr Durairaj Jawahar, board GP and mental health lead for Leicester City CCG, said: “The CCG is working very hard in Leicester to help raise awareness of dementia as well as ensure patients with a diagnosis of dementia have access to the help and support them and their families need. For example if a GP thinks their patient is showing signs of dementia, they are now trained to carry out a short and simple check which tests their memory. This is called a cognitive assessment. If they need a further assessment the GP can refer them to the most appropriate service, where they, their family or registered carer will continue to receive the support they need to manage the condition.

Diane Smith, service manager in the East Midlands speaking on behalf of the Alzheimer’s Society, said: “It was fantastic to have a local GP support us on the day. People were able to sit down with either members of our staff or the GP and discuss their concerns either about themselves, a family member or someone they care for and walk away with some good advice. They were also very interested in picking up as much literature and information as possible to take and read at home and share with family and other members of the community.”

Dementia is an umbrella term. It describes the symptoms that occur when the brain is affected by certain diseases or conditions. There are many different types of dementia although some are far more common than others. Dementia is associated with an ongoing decline of the brain and its abilities. This includes problems with, memory loss, thinking speed, mental agility, language, understanding and judgement.

Dementia Awareness Week runs from 18-24 May. If you are worried about symptoms you are having, or those of a relative, ring and speak to your family doctor. For further information on dementia projects, and events throughout the week, click on the following link to visit our website.

ENDS

For interviews or more information please contact Liz Mattock, Communications and Engagement Officer on 0116 295 4159 or liz.mattock@leicestercityccg.nhs.uk

Notes to Editors
Clinical commissioning groups are groups of GP practices which will be responsible from April 2013 for commissioning most hospital and community health services for people living in their areas. Under the Health and Social Care Act, every GP practice will be a member of a CCG. CCGs will be responsible collectively annually for approximately £60-£65 billion of the NHS budget.
Leicester City Clinical Commissioning Group was formed in 2011. Leicester City CCG represents 64 GP practices and serves a patient population of 360,000 patients.

Find out more about the Alzheimer’s Society on their website at http://alzheimers.org.uk/

Dementia is an umbrella term. It describes the symptoms that occur when the brain is affected by certain diseases or conditions. There are many different types of dementia although some are far more common than others. They are often named according to the condition that has caused the dementia. Some of the more common types are outlined here.

A video from the Alzheimer’s Society on the signs and symptoms of dementia can be viewed by clicking here.

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